If you are feeling suicidal

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If you are feeling suicidal you don’t need to act on your thoughts right now. The option of taking your own life isn’t going to go away. You can make this decision tomorrow or the next day

Try to focus on just getting through today and not the rest of your life. You may have had these thoughts before, but you feel less able to cope today. You might find that you are more skilled to cope in a few days.

Look at your crisis plan

Follow your crisis plan if you have one. You may have made a crisis plan with the help of a health professional or made your own.

If you don’t have a crisis plan you could make one Download a blank one using the following button

  DOWNLOAD


You can start to think of some things which you will find helpful. Keep this plan safe and change it as you need to.

Be aware of your trigger warnings and feelings

Triggers are things that might make you feel worse. Triggers are different for different people. You may find that certain music, photos or films make you feel worse.

You could create a Wellness Action Plan (WAPP plan ) to help you to be more self-aware. It can help you to identify triggers in your life which can make you unwell. It may help you to write down your triggers. If you can understand what your triggers are, it can help you to be more in control of your feelings or stress levels.

You can share your WAPP plan with your family or friends if you want to. Sometimes it is helpful to share with your family and friends because it can help them to understand you better.

Stay away from drugs and alcohol

Alcohol affects the parts of your brain that regulate judgement, concentration, behaviour and emotions. Drinking alcohol might make you more likely to act on suicidal ideas.

Drugs affect the way you think and feel. Different drugs have different effects. For example, cocaine can make you feel happy and more likely to take risks when you take it. But you may feel depressed after the effects stop. Other drugs can cause hallucinations, confusion and paranoia. You may be more likely to take your own life if you take illegal medications.

Go to a safe place

Go to a place where you feel safe. Below is a list of places you could try.

  • Your bedroom
  • Mental health or spiritual centre
  • Crisis centre
  • Friend’s house

Stay away from things you could use to harm yourself, such as razor blades or pills. If you have a lot of medication you can ask someone to keep it for you until you are back in control of your feelings.

Talk to other people

It could be helpful for you to talk to someone about how you’re feeling. There are different people who can help. You could speak to friends, family or your GP.

Remember to be patient. Your friends and family may want to help but might not know how to straight away. If this happens, you should tell them what you want from them. You may want to talk about how you’re feeling, or you may want them to help you get professional help.

If you don’t want to talk to people you know, you could call a helpline or use an online application

Listed are some, HELPLINE NUMBERS They are often open 24 hours a day 7 days a week.

You are with it

Be around other people if feeling Suicidal

You may find it too difficult to speak to anyone at the moment. That’s ok. But try not to spend too much time alone. You could go to a shopping centre, gym, coffee shop or park. Being around people can help to keep you safe, even if they don’t know how you’re feeling.

Distract yourself

You might feel it is impossible not to focus on your suicidal thoughts or why you feel that way. If you focus on your thoughts it might make them feel stronger and harder to cope with. Try doing things that distract you. Think about what you enjoy accomplishing.

Below are some things you could do as a distraction.

  • Read a book or magazine.
  • Watch a film or TV.
  • Go to a museum.
  • Draw or paint.
  • Listen to music.
  • Spend time with your pet.
  • Establish small goals to focus on. You could do the laundry, make a cake or tidy or organise something.

Make a list

Make a list of all the positive things about yourself and your life. It might be hard to think of these things right now, but try. Think about your strengths and positive things other people have said about you. At the end of every day write down one thing you felt good about, something you did, or something someone did for you.

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Exercise

Exercise can have a good effect on your mood and thinking. Exercise is thought to release dopamine and serotonin. These are ‘feel good’ hormones.

Relax

There are different things you could do to relax such as:

  • walk in a green space like a park,
  • listen to nature,
  • pay attention to nice smells such as coffee shops, your favourite food, a favourite perfume or soap,
  • treat yourself to a food you like and pay close attention to how it tastes, how it feels in your mouth and what you like about it, having a bath or shower,
  • looking at images that you like, such as photographs,
  • meditation or mindfulness,
  • breathing techniques or guided meditation. You can find these through a podcast or an online video website such as YouTube.

If you are in immediate danger of suicide please dial 999 for the emergency services or call. Samaritans 116123 for free.